Researchers work to develop self-healing concrete

Researchers are hoping to use concrete's natural properties to help aid in the healing process and extend the life of the material. The article summarizes much of the research into self-healing concrete.

Share This Post

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on email

self-healing concrete

In a self-healing bioconcrete, dormant bacterial spores contained in clay pellets (black and gray circles, left) germinate when cracks expose them to moisture. The microbes feed on calcium lactate to form limestone, sealing the cracks (right).

The idea of self-healing concrete originated with Carolyn Dry, an architecture professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, in the early 1990s. Dry tried to embed concrete with glass capsules that would break when a crack formed and release methyl methacrylate glues. But the glues were too viscous to flow out and fill the cracks. Plus, glass capsules would have a hard time surviving a cement mixer. But since those early efforts, scientists and engineers have found new, more effective ways to embed healing agents in concrete. Now, some of the first commercial products are in sight.

Read more here: http://cen.acs.org/articles/94/i6/Helping-Concrete-Heal-Itself.html

More To Explore